State of Massachusetts secondary Archives: on Principles & Values


Kevin O`Connor: Promises to serve no more than two terms

Kevin O`Connor supports term limits and has pledged to serve no more than two terms. Kevin also supports reforming the filibuster so that it can't be weaponized by either party to stall progress and score political points. Votes should be timely, transparent, and more issues should be taken up as narrowly targeted pieces of legislation. The omnibus bills allow too much gamesmanship, and our country deserves better.
Source: 2020 Massachusetts Senate campaign website KOCforSenate.com Oct 6, 2020

Kevin O`Connor: MA voters do not want Markey's socialism

On Senator Ed Markey: "I understand people think it's a tall order for a Republican to win a Senate race in Massachusetts. But Senator Markey is now a dyed-in-the-wool democratic socialist," O`Connor said. "I don't think the voters of Massachusetts will embrace those radical ideas in 2020."
Source: Boston Herald on 2020 Massachusetts Senate race Oct 4, 2020

Shiva Ayyadurai: Rational scientific approach for real solutions

Unite America with Real Solutions. Beyond "Left" & "Right": As a scientist, inventor, and statesman, I will bring three skill sets as your next U.S. Senator:
  1. A rational scientific approach to identify the REAL PROBLEM on any issue--beyond "Left" and "Right;"
  2. An inventor's mindset to innovate the REAL SOLUTION for that real problem; and,
  3. A statesman's skill to expose the FAKE PROBLEMS and find common ground to implement the REAL SOLUTION.
Source: 2020 Massachusetts Senate campaign website Shiva4Senate.com Jun 24, 2020

Ed Markey: Legislating is about issues: look at my record

Markey spent much of the night highlighting a record that includes filing the Green New Deal and passing laws related to pollution, Alzheimer's research and gun control,

"Yes, filing the right legislation and voting the right way is a critical part of this job, but if there's one lesson from today's Washington, D.C., it's that this is about power and if we're serious about putting the people and the causes that we care about first, you have to go out there and you have to take it," Kennedy said.

Source: Fall River Herald News on 2020 Massachusetts Senate debate Feb 18, 2020

Joe Kennedy III: Legislating is about which causes we care about first

Markey spent much of the night highlighting a record that includes filing the Green New Deal and passing laws related to pollution, Alzheimer's research and gun control.

"Yes, filing the right legislation and voting the right way is a critical part of this job, but if there's one lesson from today's Washington, D.C., it's that this is about power and if we're serious about putting the people and the causes that we care about first, you have to go out there and you have to take it," Kennedy said.

Source: Fall River Herald News on 2020 Massachusetts Senate debate Feb 18, 2020

Elizabeth Warren: DNA test shows Native American ancestry generations back

I never thought I'd get involved in politics. It wasn't on my bucket list, shopping list, or any other list. I got the chance to be a public school teacher, a college professor, and a US Senator because America invested in kids like me.

When I decided to run for the Senate in 2012, I never thought that my family's Native American heritage would come under attack and my dead parents would be called liars. I never expected my academic career to become the stuff of right-wing conspiracy theories. And I never expected the President of the United States to use my family's story as a racist political joke against Native American history, culture, and people--over, and over, and over.

I took the extra step and did a DNA test. It contains Native American ancestry. The first Native American in our family that can be proved is generations back, and there could be others. No matter. It's my family, and--like it or not Donald Trump--my family's stories are supported by this test.

Source: AdWatch: 2018 Massachusetts Senate campaign email Oct 15, 2018

Elizabeth Warren: Globe review: no use of Native American heritage in hiring

[Regarding citing Native American heritage in her Harvard job application]: First we pulled together every document we could about how I got hired. We turned over everything to the Boston Globe. They reviewed those documents and interviewed everyone they could find who was involved in my hiring. Their verdict?

"The Globe found clear evidence that her claim to Native American ethnicity was never considered by the Harvard Law faculty, which voted resoundingly to hire her, or by those who hired her to four prior positions at other law schools. At every step of her remarkable rise in the legal profession, the people responsible for hiring her saw her as a white woman."

I'm not afraid of the facts, so today we're launching a new Fact Squad website for anyone who wants see the facts for themselves: http://www.elizabethwarren.com/heritage

This new website has more than you'd ever want to know: It has personnel files. It has interviews with the people who hired me, and my own family members.

Source: AdWatch: 2018 Massachusetts Senate campaign email Oct 15, 2018

Lori Trahan: Fight to protect shared values

I am an optimist. My version of making America great is solidarity in purpose. There will be times when we need to fight to protect our shared values. I will not tolerate any assault on women, minorities, immigrants, veterans, the disabled, or our environment from this administration.
Source: 2018 Massachusetts 3rd House campaign website LoriTrahan.com Oct 9, 2018

Ayanna Pressley: Support progressive legislation with activist leadership

While Pressley and [incumbent opponent Mike] Capuano did not disagree on much substantive policy--the Democratic congressman from Massachusetts is one of the House's most staunch progressives--she characterized herself as someone who would be more of an activist leader, extending her work on behalf of the district beyond just supporting liberal legislation. "There's the vote on the floor of Congress, but then there's the work and the impact here," Pressley told The Daily Beast in July.
Source: The Daily Beast on 2018 Massachusetts 7th House race Sep 2, 2018

Joe Kennedy III: Co-sponsored Do No Harm Act: keep church and state separate

The Do No Harm Act, a bill that's designed to ensure that the federal Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA) continues to provide important protections for religious exercise while clarifying that RFRA may not be used to discriminate against or otherwise harm others, was co-introduced in the House by Joseph Kennedy, and now has over 100 House co-sponsors

Americans United supports the legislation. AU's President said that "the Do No Harm Act will ensure that we honor two core American values: religious freedom and the promise of equal protection under the law."

Congress enacted the federal RFRA in 1993 with the goal of protecting religious freedom, especially for religious minorities. At that time, a broad coalition of progressive & conservative groups supported the law. But since then, the federal RFRA has been misinterpreted by some courts and has become a vehicle for those who want to use religion to undermine protections for civil rights and access to health care.

Source: Church & State Magazine on 2020 Massachusetts Senate race Aug 8, 2018

Heidi Wellman: Keep God in the public sphere

Q: Do you support or oppose the statement, "Keep God in the public sphere"?

A: YES

Source: OnTheIssues interview of 2018 Massachusetts Senate candidate Mar 7, 2018

Setti Warren: Supports 5 out of 8 of ORMA's "People's Platform"

Of the 8 specific federal legislative proposals in ORMA's "People's Platform," I am fully comfortable supporting, without reservation, the first 5:
  1. Single Payer Healthcare
  2. Free Public College
  3. $15 Minimum Wage
  4. Equal Access to Abortion Coverage in Health Insurance
  5. Automatic Voter Registration
I will work to implement each of these in Massachusetts as governor.

[The other three are: Justice is Not For Sale Act; Inclusive Prosperity Act; and Keep It In the Ground Act].

Source: ORMA questionnaire on 2018 Massachusetts governor race Dec 20, 2017

Elizabeth Warren: Calling me "Pocahontas" is a racial slur

On President Donald Trump's criticism of Warren's claims of Native American heritage: Warren has called the Republican president's use of the name "Pocahontas" a racial slur. Warren has said she was told of her heritage by her parents and grandparents.

"At the same time she claims she is so outraged, her campaign is sending out fundraising emails using the term 'Pocahontas,'" Republican state Rep. Geoff Diehl said. Trump again used Pocahontas to refer to Warren during a recent White House event honoring Navajo Code Talkers. Later that day, Warren emailed supporters referencing the comment and soliciting campaign donations.

Warren has said she never relied on her Native American heritage to gain any advantage. In a 2012 interview with the AP, Warren said she was told her mother was part Cherokee and part Delaware. "I never used it to get anything. I didn't use it to get a job. I didn't use it to get into school," she said Monday. "The people who have hired me have made that clear."

Source: Boston Globe on 2018 Massachusetts Senatorial race Dec 5, 2017

Geoff Diehl: Served as Trump campaign co-chair in Massachusetts

Most candidates hoping to unseat U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren in next year's election aren't shying away from President Donald Trump's criticism of her claims of Native American heritage, although all but one say they won't be adopting Trump's habit of deriding the Massachusetts Democrat as "Pocahontas."

Warren has called the Republican president's use of the name a racial slur. "At the same time she claims she is so outraged, her campaign is sending out fundraising emails using the term 'Pocahontas,'" Republican state Rep. Geoff Diehl said. "Once again, Sen. Warren is speaking out of both sides of her mouth."

Of the four main Warren challengers, Diehl has the closest ties to Trump, having served as co-chairman of his campaign in Massachusetts. Diehl said Warren "brought these attacks upon herself by being the chief obstructionist in Washington" and called her criticism of Trump's ridicule "more phony political outrage to build her national profile to run for president."

Source: Boston Globe on 2018 Massachusetts Senatorial race Dec 5, 2017

John Kingston: Calling Warren "Pocahontas" is inappropriate but she did lie

Most candidates hoping to unseat U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren in next year's election aren't shying away from President Donald Trump's criticism of her claims of Native American heritage, although all but one say they won't be adopting Trump's habit of deriding the Massachusetts Democrat as "Pocahontas."

Warren has called the Republican president's use of the name a racial slur.

Trump again used Pocahontas to refer to Warren during a recent White House event honoring Navajo Code Talkers. Business executive John Kingston said that Trump's decision to use the name during the veteran's event was inappropriate but that his criticism is fair.

"I certainly won't be using such a term on the campaign trail--but Sen. Warren's misrepresentation of her heritage is part of a pattern that clearly troubles voters, one of using mistruths, divisive rhetoric and grandstanding to advance herself and now boost her presidential ambitions," Kingston said.

Source: Boston Globe on 2018 Massachusetts Senatorial race Dec 5, 2017

Shiva Ayyadurai: Warren shoplifted racial identity of Native American

Most candidates hoping to unseat U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren in next year's election aren't shying away from President Donald Trump's criticism of her claims of Native American heritage, although all but one say they won't be adopting Trump's habit of deriding the Massachusetts Democrat as "Pocahontas."

Technology entrepreneur Shiva Ayyadurai has embraced Trump's use of the term. Ayyadurai, who began the race as a Republican but is now running as an independent, already used Pocahontas to refer to Warren in a tweet. He said Warren "has literally shoplifted the racial identity of Native American for her own personal gain," including a job as a law professor at Harvard University.

Warren has acknowledged telling Harvard and an earlier employer, the University of Pennsylvania, of her heritage but only after she had been hired. Pocahontas was a native woman who lived in present-day Virginia in the 1600s and agreed to marry an English colonist to help ensure peace and protect her people.

Source: Boston Globe on 2018 Massachusetts Senatorial race Dec 5, 2017

Elizabeth Warren: We will stand up to bigotry against anyone

And that marks Democrats' first job in this new era: We will stand up to bigotry. There is no compromise here. In all its forms, we will fight back against attacks on Latinos, African Americans, women, Muslims, immigrants, disabled Americans--on anyone. Whether Donald Trump sits in a glass tower or sits in the White House, we will not give an inch on this, not now, not ever. The American people are sick of politicians wallowing in the campaign contributions and dark money. They are revolted by influence peddling by wealthy people and giant corporations. If Donald Trump is ready to make good on his promise to get corruption out of politics, to end dark money and pay-to-play, count me in. I will work as hard as I can and to pull as many people as I can to end the influence of big money and return democracy to the people.
Source: Medium.com weblog on 2018 Massachusetts Senate race Nov 10, 2016

Martha Coakley: I know how tough my 2010 Senate loss was for many people

Coakley has been leading all the opinion polls but barely skimmed into second place with 23% of convention votes. Some delegates seemed anxious that she will not be a winnable candidate in the general election because of her stunning 2010 loss to Republican Scott Brown in the U.S. Senate special election. "The 2010 Senate election was very painful for a lot of people in this room," Coakley said in her speech to delegates, trying to tackle that elephant in the room.

"I felt it really was important to say to people, 'I know how tough that loss was,' " Coakley said afterward. "I think people recognize that we don't win every race."

Coakley said she's jumping back into the political ring to continue to fight for issues she's worked on as attorney general. With a tight smile and a wave, she insisted she was pleased with Saturday's results. "It's terrific. We had a goal coming in that we wanted to get our 15% to get on the ballot," Coakley said. "We've had a great day."

Source: WBUR on 2014 Massachusetts gubernatorial race at Convention Jun 15, 2014

Steve Grossman: We need a job creator, not a prosecutor, for governor

"I'm going to make the argument that this state needs a progressive job creator, not a prosecutor as the next governor," Grossman said after the 90-minute debate. With the struggles of past attorneys general to ascend to the governor's office, Grossman seemed to use the word "prosecutor" as a negative to describe his chief rival for the Democratic nomination. "Martha Coakley is a prosecutor. That's fundamentally what she is," Grossman said. Asked to explain what he meant, Grossman said, "She spent her life as a prosecutor. We need a job creator."

Coakley said she was not paying attention to the poll numbers, and said her career as a prosecutor in Middlesex County and at the state level was not a detriment to her campaign. She noted her fights against bank home foreclosures and challenging the Defense of Marriage Act.

Source: WWLP 22-News on 2014 Massachusetts gubernatorial debate Jun 10, 2014

Richard Tisei: Iconoclast in GOP; former state Senate minority leader

The candidate: Richard Tisei, former state Senate minority leader.

One thing remains the same in Tisei's 2nd straight run for the Democrat-held seat in Massachusetts' 6th District--as an openly-gay New Englander, Tisei is an iconoclast in his party.

The Republican said that he does not find himself in a hostile party. In fact, given that he represents one of the party's best chances to once again hold a New England congressional seat--something he thinks is necessary for the GOP to be a national party--Tisei is seeing plenty of support. "I feel very comfortable with the history of the party," Tisei said, mentioning the GOP's involvement in women's suffrage and the Civil Rights movement. "I'm also a small business owner. I support our free enterprise system," Tisei added. "People should be making choices for themselves, rather than the government making choices for them. So in a lot of the philosophies, both economic and as far as individual rights go, I feel very comfortable in the party.

Source: Rollcall.com e-zine Q&A on 2014 Massachusetts House race Mar 26, 2014

Don Berwick: Son of a Connecticut doctor; attended med school in Boston

Q: Let's talk about your origins. You're a New Englander, right? You grew up in Connecticut?

A: That's right. I grew up in a small town in Connecticut called Moodus. My father was a G.P. in the town. He made house calls, delivered babies--did everything. He did fluoroscopy in his office. He rounded out every day of my young life at the hospital 17 miles away--a real old-style G.P.

Q: And then you went off to Harvard for college and medical school. And you also have a master's degree in public policy from the Kennedy School, and you trained in pediatrics at Boston Children's Hospital. Is that right?

A: Yes. I actually did a year of internal medicine first, at Massachusetts General Hospital as a medical intern. I loved that, but I always had a special place for kids in my heart and decided to switch to pediatrics, and so I completed my training at Boston Children's Hospital.

Source: Medscape interview on 2014 Massachusetts governor's race Feb 18, 2014

Don Berwick: OpEd: "The second most dangerous man in America"

Don Berwick told reporters and voters at Suffolk University what kind of leader he would be if elected governor in November. The man conservative commentator Glenn Beck called, "the second most dangerous man in America" was bright, positive, and upbeat throughout the roundtable. He said he was looking forward to working with the Massachusetts legislature, but alluded to his tougher side. "If you disagree with me, I will fight you," Berwick told the Suffolk audience. "I'm not as nice as I look."

"The foundation of leadership is more values than strategy," said Berwick. "When the values are right and goals are bold, people want to do well. I will be the same in the corner office."

Berwick stressed his work in non-profits, where he studied other organizations and what makes them work better. "The most important decision an executive makes is who he or she selects to carry out the agenda you agree on," said Berwick. "My management style is to seek out the best people."

Source: Walpole Times on 2014 Massachusetts Governor race Jan 25, 2014

Mike Lee: Give me 17 months and I will achieve bipartisanship

Q: Can you win against Ed Markey?

GOMEZ: This election is about putting people before politics. Congressman Markey has had 37 years down there to get things done in terms of immigration reform, comprehensive tax reform, entitlement reform. Give me 17 months and I will keep my word and I don't need 37 years like Congressman Markey has had.

Q: 17 months is the time left in John Kerry's term, but you would be just one of 100 members of the Senate. How are you going to break the gridlock in Washington singlehandedly?

GOMEZ: If a Navy SEAL can talk a Peace Corps volunteer into marrying him, I think I can work with anybody. I look forward to working with President Obama, I look forward to working with all the senators in DC I have been bipartisan my whole life. That's the problem we have in DC right now. We have such a high level of cynicism, fiscal mismanagement and hyper partisanship. And the issues are so big that we need to reach across the aisle, respect the other side and get things done.

Source: Fox News Sunday on 2013 Massachusetts Senate debate Jun 23, 2013

Bob Massie: Overcame childhood hemophilia, hepatitis, and HIV

Bob Massie is an expert at overcoming hurdles in life. As a young boy he suffered from hemophilia and spent much of his childhood in braces, unable to walk. He contracted hepatitis and HIV after blood transfusions, \and needed a new liver to survive. He's offered himself to the Massachusetts General Hospital for medical studies--the results of which ushered in a new era of HIV research. He's left little time for self pity. He writes about his journey from sickly child to international philanthropist with grace and candor in his memoir, "A Song in the Night".

"My original title was `Surviving Hemophilia, HIV and Hepatitis.' It was so boring. I decided to take a totally different approach and tell five stories instead," says Massie. When asked about the medical timing, Massie notes, "If I had been born earlier, I would not have survived. If I had been born later, I wouldn't have \gotten HIV. The medical care was good enough to keep me going, but flawed.

Source: Time Magazine on 2018 Massachusetts governor race May 15, 2012

Karyn Polito: Voted YES on 'one nation under God' in pledge of allegiance

Massachusetts Democratic Party Platform indicates voting NO in Part I: CIVIL RIGHTS:Clause 7: Church & State. [State Rep. Polito, a Republican, voted YES].

A Resolution, filed by Rep. Jones (R, North Reading), would reaffirm the reference to "one nation under God" in the pledge of allegiance.

The relevant part of the MassDems Platform is Part I, clause 7: CIVIL RIGHTS AND CIVIL LIBERTIES: We reaffirm our commitment to the constitutional guarantee of separation of church and state, and of the freedom to worship without governmental interference.

Bill H.4402 ; vote number H205

Source: Massachusetts House voting record via MassScorecard.org Sep 20, 2005

Marty Walsh: Voted YES on 'one nation under God' in pledge of allegiance

Massachusetts Democratic Party Platform indicates voting NO in Part I: CIVIL RIGHTS:Clause 7: Church & State. [State Rep. Walsh, a Democrat, voted YES].

A Resolution, filed by Rep. Jones (R, North Reading), would reaffirm the reference to "one nation under God" in the pledge of allegiance.

The relevant part of the MassDems Platform is Part I, clause 7: CIVIL RIGHTS AND CIVIL LIBERTIES: We reaffirm our commitment to the constitutional guarantee of separation of church and state, and of the freedom to worship without governmental interference.

Bill H.4402 ; vote number H205

Source: Massachusetts House voting record via MassScorecard.org Sep 20, 2005

John Kerry: Contest between common sense values and extreme ideologues

This is not the normal contest of Democrats versus Republicans. This is a contest between common sense American values and extreme ideologues whose agenda is to dismantle 50 years of Democratic achievement and we’re not going to let them do it. Some people [say] that they can’t tell the difference between us and them. Well, the differences could not be more clear - the agenda could not be more compelling - and the stakes could not be higher. Our agenda is as clear as it is different and fairer.
Source: Keynote Speech to Massachusetts Democratic Issues Convention Jun 7, 2003

Carla Howell: Number one issue: Big government versus small government

Q: What is your number one campaign issue?

A: Big government versus small government. One simple issue, one simple choice. Big government problems, or small government solutions. Big government is the problem; small government is the solution. I am campaigning for small government. You either get big government and high taxes or small government and low taxes.

Source: Eric Darbe, Massachusetts News Jan 5, 2000

  • The above quotations are from Commonwealth of Massachusetts Politicians: secondary Archives.
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2020 Presidential contenders on Principles & Values:
  Democrats running for President:
Sen.Michael Bennet (D-CO)
V.P.Joe Biden (D-DE)
Mayor Mike Bloomberg (I-NYC)
Gov.Steve Bullock (D-MT)
Mayor Pete Buttigieg (D-IN)
Sen.Cory Booker (D-NJ)
Secy.Julian Castro (D-TX)
Gov.Lincoln Chafee (L-RI)
Rep.John Delaney (D-MD)
Rep.Tulsi Gabbard (D-HI)
Sen.Amy Klobuchar (D-MN)
Gov.Deval Patrick (D-MA)
Sen.Bernie Sanders (I-VT)
CEO Tom Steyer (D-CA)
Sen.Elizabeth Warren (D-MA)
Marianne Williamson (D-CA)
CEO Andrew Yang (D-NY)

2020 Third Party Candidates:
Rep.Justin Amash (L-MI)
CEO Don Blankenship (C-WV)
Gov.Lincoln Chafee (L-RI)
Howie Hawkins (G-NY)
Gov.Gary Johnson(L-NM)
Howard Schultz(I-WA)
Gov.Jesse Ventura (I-MN)
Republicans running for President:
Sen.Ted Cruz(R-TX)
Gov.Larry Hogan (R-MD)
Gov.John Kasich(R-OH)
V.P.Mike Pence(R-IN)
Gov.Mark Sanford (R-SC)
Pres.Donald Trump(R-NY)
Rep.Joe Walsh (R-IL)
Gov.Bill Weld(R-MA & L-NY)

2020 Withdrawn Democratic Candidates:
Sen.Stacey Abrams (D-GA)
Mayor Bill de Blasio (D-NYC)
Sen.Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY)
Sen.Mike Gravel (D-AK)
Sen.Kamala Harris (D-CA)
Gov.John Hickenlooper (D-CO)
Gov.Jay Inslee (D-WA)
Mayor Wayne Messam (D-FL)
Rep.Seth Moulton (D-MA)
Rep.Beto O`Rourke (D-TX)
Rep.Tim Ryan (D-CA)
Adm.Joe Sestak (D-PA)
Rep.Eric Swalwell (D-CA)
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Page last updated: Jan 26, 2021