State of Ohio Archives: on Crime


John Kasich: Spared 7 death-row inmates; executed 15 more

Ohio Gov. John Kasich has finished dealing with executions for the remainder of his time in office. The Republican governor spared seven men from execution during his two terms in office, including commutations on March 26 and July 20. Kasich allowed 15 executions to proceed.

Kasich "appreciates the gravity of this authority and therefore carefully considers these cases to make decisions that further justice," said a spokesman. Ohio resumed executions in 1999 under Gov. Bob Taft after a 36-year gap. Taft said he's now opposed to capital punishment except in the most severe cases.

Sparing inmates is not the political death knell it might have been in decades past, thanks to concerns about innocence raised by DNA testing and the role of severe mental illness on some offenders' behavior. "Kasich's decisions to commute reflect a societal shift away from an unquestioning belief in the value of the death penalty or at least the value in every case," said a University of Dayton law professor.

Source: Cincinnati Enquirer on 2018 Ohio gubernatorial race Jul 30, 2018

Ted Strickland: Spared 5 death-row inmates; executed 17 more

Ohio Gov. John Kasich spared seven men from execution during his two terms in office, and allowed 15 executions to proceed. Kasich's immediate predecessor, Democratic Gov. Ted Strickland, commuted five death sentences and allowed 17 executions during his four-year term.

Ohio resumed executions in 1999 after a 36-year gap. Sparing inmates is not the political death knell it might have been in decades past, thanks to concerns about innocence raised by DNA testing and the role of severe mental illness on some offenders' behavior. "Kasich's decisions to commute reflect a societal shift away from an unquestioning belief in the value of the death penalty or at least the value in every case," said a University of Dayton law professor.

Strickland said he doesn't think he paid a political price for his commutations, which he tried to use "as judiciously and appropriately as I could."

Source: Cincinnati Enquirer on 2018 Ohio gubernatorial race Jul 30, 2018

Mike Gibbons: Stricter punishment reduces crime

Q: Do you support or oppose the statement, "Stricter punishment reduces crime"?

A: Strongly support

Source: OnTheIssues interview of 2018 Ohio Senate candidate Apr 24, 2018

John Kasich: Rehab, not prison, for low-level offenders

The local judges now are not sending everybody to prison when they're a low offender. And I want to thank the judge, the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, because we work with judges to bring rational thinking into this and to keep them in the local community where they can be rehabbed, get their life back, and the public can be safe. We have now the lowest entry into our state prisons in 27 years. It's starting to work.
Source: 2018 Ohio State of the State address Mar 7, 2018

Connie Pillich: Worked as public defender, and challenged predatory lenders

In the Air Force, Connie completed her MBA, served in Berlin at the height of the cold war, and served in support of Operations Desert Storm and Desert Shield. Connie and her husband then settled in Cincinnati and started a family, and she graduated from law school.

Connie worked as a public defender and later opened her own law practice where she challenged predatory lenders on behalf of vulnerable senior citizens.

Source: 2018 Ohio gubernatorial campaign website ConniePillich.com May 2, 2017

Jim Renacci: Opposes capital punishment

Renacci, a father of three, grew up in a blue collar family in western Pennsylvania and was the first in his family to graduate college. He began his career as an accountant before shifting to business management and ownership. He was a volunteer firefighter, city councilman and mayor in Wadsworth. He opposes abortion, capital punishment and gay marriage but supports Trump's proposals to build a wall on the border with Mexico, impose a temporary travel ban and repeal and replace ObamaCare.
Source: Dayton Daily News on 2018 Ohio gubernatorial race Feb 4, 2017

John Kasich: Black Lives Matter means the system doesn't work for them

Kasich is the governor of Ohio, the site of one of the most horrific incidents that animate Black Lives Matter. Tamir Rice was a 12-year-old playing with a toy gun in a Cleveland park when he was shot & killed by police in November 2014. It was also in Cleveland where two unarmed people were fatally killed when police fired on their car 137 times in 2012.

So when Kasich met with The Post's editorial board, I had one question: When you hear the phrase "Black lives matter," what do you hear? "Well, what I hear is that there are people that are in this country who think the system not only doesn't work for them," he said, "but it works against them."

Kasich then unleashed a torrent of information on everything he had done for the African American community. There was the commission to heal the fractured trust between police and people of color. He talked about efforts to reform the schools and welfare. And he boasted about signing a law to "ban the box" and reducing prison recidivism.

Source: Washington Post on 2018 Ohio gubernatorial race Apr 21, 2016

John Kasich: Police must understand challenges of black community

I asked Gov. Kasich what he would say to fellow Republicans who might be upset with [Kasich's support of "Black Lives matter"] and who don't think there is a problem. "What would I say? Tough," Kasich said.

What struck me as a breath of fresh air was really Kasich being consistent. What he told us was in keeping with what he has been saying for months now, [like this excerpt from a] CNN interview last August]: "Black lives matter, especially now, because there's a fear in these communities that, you know, justice isn't working for them. But it's about balance. The community has to understand the challenges of police, and the police have to understand the challenges of the community."

There's something about that "especially now" that reveals a person who heard his constituents and understands their fears and concerns. This is exactly where the Republican Party ought to be in 2016. Working on tough issues and expanding the reach of the GOP while adhering to its conservative principles.

Source: Washington Post on 2018 Ohio gubernatorial race Apr 21, 2016

John Kasich: Ban the box: no criminal history check on job applications

Gov. Kasich signed into law a bill that will bar public employers from including on job applications questions concerning an applicant's criminal background. The signing of the "ban the box" vote comes amid growing national concern that the job application check box about a person's criminal history can deter offenders from seeking jobs and can cause employers to miss out on qualified workers.

Earlier this month, the Ohio Senate voted overwhelmingly, on a 32-1 vote, to "ban the box" for public-sector jobs. Under the bill, a public employer would still be allowed to do a background check and reject applicants with recent or relevant offenses. But the record check gets done later in the process, usually after an interview. The bill does not apply to people seeking private employment.

Kasich earlier instructed the state's human resources department to "ban the box" in June, by voluntarily adopting the Ohio Justice & Policy Center and Ohio Organizing Collaborative's recommendations.

Source: Cincinnati Enquirer on 2018 Ohio gubernatorial race Dec 23, 2015

P.G. Sittenfeld: Mandatory minimum sentencing causes black mass incarceration

The problem of institutional racism is real. It must be addressed. And public officials need to acknowledge that not every problem in our inner cities is related to economics. Take the problem of mass incarceration, for example.

That America has less than 5% of the world's population--but 25% of the world's total prison population--is both shocking and disgraceful. At a time when crime has fallen to historic lows all across the nation, it is outrageous that nearly a third of all black males will spend at least part of their lives in prison.

Over-incarceration does little to reduce crime. But it does a lot to destroy families, burden taxpayers, and increase joblessness. Right now, 1 out of every 28 children has a parent in prison. Taxpayers spend about $80 billion a year to keep them there.

[We should] rethink arbitrary, mandatory minimum sentencing, especially for low-level, non-violent offenses that are more effectively--and more cheaply--handled through probation and diversion programs

Source: 2016 Ohio Senate race: Center of Hope Baptist Church speech Aug 9, 2015

Michael Pryce: Supports capital punishment

Q: Do you support capital punishment for certain crimes?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support reduced prison sentences for non-violent offenders?

A: No.

Q: Do you support mandatory prison sentences for selling illegal drugs?

A: Yes.

Source: Ohio Congressional Election 2010 Political Courage Test Nov 1, 2010

Michael Pryce: No reduced prison sentences for non-violent offenders

Q: Do you support programs that provide prison inmates with vocational and job-related training and job-placement assistance when released?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support programs that provide prison inmates with substance abuse treatment?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support reduced prison sentences for non-violent offenders?

A: No.

Q: Do you support mandatory prison sentences for selling illegal drugs?

A: Yes.

Source: Ohio Congressional Election 2010 Political Courage Test Nov 1, 2010

Richard Cordray: Endorsements by law enforcement reflects his efforts as AG

Ohio AG Richard Cordray said he has restored professionalism to the scandal-ridden office he took over in 2009, has made sweeping reforms to better serve law enforcement officials and has focused on protecting the financial security of residents. He said that since then he has focused on his campaign promises, including finding more ways to help police and sheriff departments "do their best work." He said he measures his success by the fact all 7 law enforcement organizations have endorsed him.
Source: Akron Beacon-Journal on 2018 Ohio gubernatorial race Oct 8, 2010

Eric Deaton: Being pro-life, I believe in very limited capital punishment

Q: Do you support capital punishment for certain crimes?

A: Yes. Being pro-life, I believe in very limited capital punishment, but when the rights and privileges of life are forfeited through heinous crimes where there is no doubt of guilt, let them die.

Source: Ohio Congressional 2010 Political Courage Test Aug 11, 2010

Lee Fisher: Created Ohio's first DNA database

Lee has consistently supported measures to strengthen local law enforcement and when elected to the US Senate, he will fight to fully fund the community-oriented policing program and local law enforcement block grant programs.
  • In the early 1990s, Lee worked with leaders of both political parties to assist law enforcement by initiating the creation of Ohio's first DNA database. The database consisted of samples from violent felons, unknown offenders and unidentified victims, and was made available to local and federal law enforcement as a tool for tracking down perpetrators of new crimes.
  • President Bill Clinton named Lee Fisher as Chair of The National Commission on Crime Prevention and Control, a Commission created to develop a comprehensive proposal for preventing & controlling crime and violence in the US. Unfortunately, the Commission was never funded by Congress, but his appointment by the President was a further demonstration of Lee's national reputation as a proven crime-fighter.
    Source: 2010 Senate campaign website, fisherforohio.com, "Issues" Dec 25, 2009

    Steven Driehaus: Moratorium on the death penalty

    Source: 2000 Ohio National Political Awareness Test Nov 4, 2008

    Josh Mandel: Voted YES on lethal force against home intruders

    Mandel voted YES on SB 184, "Lethal Force Against Intruders". The bill passed the House, 73-23. Summary:
    Source: Ohio Senate Bill SB 184 summary May 28, 2008

    Eric Fingerhut: Support death penalty; ban racial profiling

    Source: Ohio Congressional 2002 National Political Awareness Test Nov 5, 2002

    Eric Fingerhut: No parole for repeat offenders

    Source: Ohio Congressional 2002 National Political Awareness Test Nov 5, 2002

    Joyce Beatty: Moratorium on the death penalty

    Source: Ohio Legislative 2000 National Political Awareness Test Nov 1, 2000

    Joyce Beatty: End parole for repeat violent offenders

    Source: Ohio Legislative 2000 National Political Awareness Test Nov 1, 2000

    Charlie Wilson: Supports alternative sentencing & rehabilitation

    Source: 1998 Ohio Legislative National Political Awareness Test Nov 1, 1998

    Lee Fisher: Expand the use of the death penalty

    Source: Ohio Gubernatorial 1998 National Political Awareness Test Nov 1, 1998

    Lee Fisher: More prisons; less parole for repeat violent felons

    Source: Ohio Gubernatorial 1998 National Political Awareness Test Nov 1, 1998

    • The above quotations are from State of Ohio Politicians: Archives.
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    2020 Presidential contenders on Crime:
      Democrats running for President:
    Sen.Michael Bennet (D-CO)
    V.P.Joe Biden (D-DE)
    Mayor Mike Bloomberg (I-NYC)
    Gov.Steve Bullock (D-MT)
    Mayor Pete Buttigieg (D-IN)
    Sen.Cory Booker (D-NJ)
    Secy.Julian Castro (D-TX)
    Gov.Lincoln Chafee (L-RI)
    Rep.John Delaney (D-MD)
    Rep.Tulsi Gabbard (D-HI)
    Sen.Amy Klobuchar (D-MN)
    Gov.Deval Patrick (D-MA)
    Sen.Bernie Sanders (I-VT)
    CEO Tom Steyer (D-CA)
    Sen.Elizabeth Warren (D-MA)
    Marianne Williamson (D-CA)
    CEO Andrew Yang (D-NY)

    2020 Third Party Candidates:
    Rep.Justin Amash (L-MI)
    CEO Don Blankenship (C-WV)
    Gov.Lincoln Chafee (L-RI)
    Howie Hawkins (G-NY)
    Gov.Gary Johnson(L-NM)
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    Republicans running for President:
    Sen.Ted Cruz(R-TX)
    Gov.Larry Hogan (R-MD)
    Gov.John Kasich(R-OH)
    V.P.Mike Pence(R-IN)
    Gov.Mark Sanford (R-SC)
    Pres.Donald Trump(R-NY)
    Rep.Joe Walsh (R-IL)
    Gov.Bill Weld(R-MA & L-NY)

    2020 Withdrawn Democratic Candidates:
    Sen.Stacey Abrams (D-GA)
    Mayor Bill de Blasio (D-NYC)
    Sen.Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY)
    Sen.Mike Gravel (D-AK)
    Sen.Kamala Harris (D-CA)
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    Rep.Tim Ryan (D-CA)
    Adm.Joe Sestak (D-PA)
    Rep.Eric Swalwell (D-CA)
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