State of Ohio Archives: on Drugs


Mike DeWine: Focus on children of drug abusers; and help parents

We are going to educate children on the dangers of drug, alcohol, and tobacco use and teach them the skills on how to make healthy decisions throughout their lives. We are going to expand wrap-around service models, such as our Ohio Sobriety, Treatment, Abuse, and Reducing Trauma program, known as OhioSTART. It provides specialized victim services to children who have been abused or neglected because of parental drug use, and it provides drug treatment for those parents.
Source: 2019 State of the State address to the Ohio legislature Mar 5, 2019

Jim Renacci: Opposes recreational marijuana legalization

Q: Legalize or decriminalize marijuana?

Sherrod Brown (D): Supports medical legalization. Wants to study how legalizing recreational works elsewhere before legalizing in Ohio. Opposes federal intervention.

Jim Renacci (R): Opposes recreational legalization. Watch how medical implementation goes. Voted against protecting states from federal intervention.

Source: 2018 CampusElect.org Issue Guide on Ohio Senate race Oct 9, 2018

Mike DeWine: Opposes recreational marijuana; opposes Ballot issue 1

Q: Legalize or decriminalize marijuana? Support Ohio Ballot Issue 1, which reduces first & second arrests for simple drug possession to non-jail time misdemeanors? Related, how to best address opioid crisis?

Richard Cordray (D): Would legalize. Supports Issue 1 as alternative to failed drug & incarceration policies. "Can't arrest way out of opioid crisis," so fund treatment & prevention programs, train law enforcement, & boost state support for families.

Mike DeWine (R): Opposes recreational marijuana legalization or decriminalization. Sued Toledo when the city passed municipal decriminalization. Also opposes Issue 1. To help address opioid crisis, expand substance-abuse & early intervention programs, and add drug courts.

Source: 2018 CampusElect.org Issue Guide on Ohio Governor race Oct 9, 2018

Richard Cordray: Can't arrest way out of opioid crisis

Q: Legalize or decriminalize marijuana? Support Ohio Ballot Issue 1, which reduces first & second arrests for simple drug possession to non-jail time misdemeanors? Related, how to best address opioid crisis?

Richard Cordray (D): Would legalize. Supports Issue 1 as alternative to failed drug & incarceration policies. "Can't arrest way out of opioid crisis," so fund treatment & prevention programs, train law enforcement, & boost state support for families.

Mike DeWine (R): Opposes recreational marijuana legalization or decriminalization. Sued Toledo when the city passed municipal decriminalization. Also opposes Issue 1. To help address opioid crisis, expand substance-abuse & early intervention programs, and add drug courts.

Source: 2018 CampusElect.org Issue Guide on Ohio Governor race Oct 9, 2018

Sherrod Brown: Supports medical legalization; opposes federal intervention

Q: Legalize or decriminalize marijuana?

Sherrod Brown (D): Supports medical legalization. Wants to study how legalizing recreational works elsewhere before legalizing in Ohio. Opposes federal intervention.

Jim Renacci (R): Opposes recreational legalization. Watch how medical implementation goes. Voted against protecting states from federal intervention.

Source: 2018 CampusElect.org Issue Guide on Ohio Senate race Oct 9, 2018

John Kasich: Longer prison sentences for fentanyl-related offenses

Gov. John Kasich signed into law a bill imposing longer prison sentences for "merchants of death" dealing fentanyl. Kasich's signing of Senate Bill 1 increases prison sentences for drug offenses involving fentanyl-related compounds, with those convicted potentially facing more felony time for trafficking, possession and funding of trafficking involving the deadly synthetic opioid that has fueled a spiral of fatal overdoses.

The bill lowers the amounts required to trigger escalating levels of felony penalties, keeping offenders in prison longer. "We're sending a message ... they're going to go to prison for a very long time," Kasich said.

Drug dealers convicted as major drug offenders in fentanyl-compound cases face additional mandatory prison terms of three to eight years. In some cases, the penalty for permitting drug abuse involving fentanyl will increase from a first-degree misdemeanor (a maximum of six months in jail) to a fifth-degree felony (up to a year in prison).

Source: Columbus Dispatch on Ohio legislative records: Senate Bill 1 Aug 1, 2018

Mike DeWine: Keep low-level drug use a felony instead of a misdemeanor

Gov. John Kasich said he is leaning toward supporting a ballot issue to prevent many low-level drug use and possession offenders from being sent to state prisons. Kasich signaled his potential support for Issue 1 on the Nov. 6 ballot, a constitutional amendment that would convert low-level drug use and possession felonies to first-degree misdemeanors that would divert offenders out of prison to addiction treatment. It also could lead to the release of those now imprisoned in state facilities for minor drug offenses.

"It's important for low-level offenders to not be in the prison system," the second-term Republican governor said, adding he wants to study the issue further. It is opposed by Attorney General Mike DeWine, the Republican candidate for governor, and supported by his opponent, Democrat Richard Cordray.

Source: The Columbus Dispatch on 2018 Ohio gubernatorial race Aug 1, 2018

Richard Cordray: Make low-level drug use a misdemeanor; treatment not prison

Gov. John Kasich said he is leaning toward supporting a ballot issue to prevent many low-level drug use and possession offenders from being sent to state prisons. Kasich signaled his potential support for Issue 1 on the Nov. 6 ballot, a constitutional amendment that would convert low-level drug use and possession felonies to first-degree misdemeanors that would divert offenders out of prison to addiction treatment. It also could lead to the release of those now imprisoned in state facilities for minor drug offenses.

"It's important for low-level offenders to not be in the prison system," the second-term Republican governor said, adding he wants to study the issue further. It is opposed by Attorney General Mike DeWine, the Republican candidate for governor, and supported by his opponent, Democrat Richard Cordray.

Source: The Columbus Dispatch on 2018 Ohio gubernatorial race Aug 1, 2018

Mike Gibbons: Marijuana is not a gateway drug

Q: Do you support or oppose the statement, "Marijuana is a gateway drug"?

A: Oppose

Source: OnTheIssues interview of 2018 Ohio Senate candidate Apr 24, 2018

Richard Cordray: We cannot arrest our way out of opioid crisis: tackle causes

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Richard Cordray faulted Republicans for doing too little to fight the opioid crisis and said he would immediately declare a state emergency and begin to better fund social services to address the problem at its roots. "As governor, I'll bring urgency and badly-needed resources to this fight, and will partner closely with local leaders to stop this plague from causing even more damage." Cordray said Ohio cannot "arrest our way out" of the problem.
Source: NBC 4i WCMH-TV on 2018 Ohio gubernatorial race Mar 26, 2018

Mary Taylor: Focus on prevention and reducing the supply of drugs

The number of fatalities from drug overdoses in Ohio is staggering. This is a crisis for the entire nation and Ohio is the epicenter. As Governor, Mary Taylor will build on the efforts that have been established to focus on prevention and reducing the supply of drugs: