State of Ohio Archives: on Government Reform


Jim Renacci: Corporate political donations are protected political speech

Q: Require political ads to disclose their largest funders?

Sherrod Brown (D): Yes. "Special interests should not have a louder voice. than middle-class families."

Jim Renacci (R): No stand found. Did support strengthening Federal Elections Commission.

Q: Support Citizens United decision, allowing unlimited political donations from corporations & unions?

Sherrod Brown (D): No. "Corporations are not people." Supports amendment to overturn.

Jim Renacci (R): Yes. Considers political donations to be political speech--"the most protected speech there is."

Source: 2018 CampusElect.org Issue Guide on Ohio Senate race Oct 9, 2018

Mike DeWine: Opposed McCain-Feingold bill limiting political donations

Q: Campaign Finance: Limit political donations from corporations & unions?

Richard Cordray (D): Yes. Supported McCain-Feingold bill. Also supports public financing of campaigns.

Mike DeWine (R): No. Voted against McCain-Feingold.

Source: 2018 CampusElect.org Issue Guide on Ohio Governor race Oct 9, 2018

Mike DeWine: Supports purging voter rolls

Q: Support stricter voting rules such major voter purges, even if they prevent some people from voting?

Richard Cordray (D): No. "The right to vote is vital to our democracy." Make it "more accessible to Ohioans," don't take it away."

Mike DeWine (R): Yes. Applauds US Supreme Court decision upholding Ohio's strict method for purging voter rolls.

Source: 2018 CampusElect.org Issue Guide on Ohio Governor race Oct 9, 2018

Richard Cordray: Limit political donations from corporations & unions

Q: Campaign Finance: Limit political donations from corporations & unions?

Richard Cordray (D): Yes. Supported McCain-Feingold bill. Also supports public financing of campaigns.

Mike DeWine (R): No. Voted against McCain-Feingold.

Source: 2018 CampusElect.org Issue Guide on Ohio Governor race Oct 9, 2018

Richard Cordray: The right to vote is vital to our democracy

Q: Support stricter voting rules such major voter purges, even if they prevent some people from voting?

Richard Cordray (D): No. "The right to vote is vital to our democracy." Make it "more accessible to Ohioans," don't take it away."

Mike DeWine (R): Yes. Applauds US Supreme Court decision upholding Ohio's strict method for purging voter rolls.

Source: 2018 CampusElect.org Issue Guide on Ohio Governor race Oct 9, 2018

Sherrod Brown: Special interests shouldn't have louder voice than families

Q: Require political ads to disclose their largest funders?

Sherrod Brown (D): Yes. "Special interests should not have a louder voice. than middle-class families."

Jim Renacci (R): No stand found. Did support strengthening Federal Elections Commission.

Q: Support Citizens United decision, allowing unlimited political donations from corporations & unions?

Sherrod Brown (D): No. "Corporations are not people." Supports amendment to overturn.

Jim Renacci (R): Yes. Considers political donations to be political speech--"the most protected speech there is."

Source: 2018 CampusElect.org Issue Guide on Ohio Senate race Oct 9, 2018

Sherrod Brown: Photo-ID rules discourage people from voting

Q: Voting Rights: Support stricter voting rules like photo-ID requirements?

Sherrod Brown (D): No. Should be encouraging people. Photo-ID rules make it harder.

Jim Renacci (R): Unknown.

Source: 2018 CampusElect.org Issue Guide on Ohio Senate race Oct 9, 2018

Mike Gibbons: Opposes making voter registration easier

Q: Do you support or oppose the statement, "Make voter registration easier"?

A: Oppose

Source: OnTheIssues interview of 2018 Ohio Senate candidate Apr 24, 2018

Mike Gibbons: Signed term limit pledge

Gibbons signed the U.S. Term Limits Amendment Pledge and said that he would only serve a maximum of two terms in the U.S. Senate. Mike Gibbons said, "I'm not running for Senate as the next step in my political career, I'm running to get things done." The Pledge is a promise to sponsor and vote for an Amendment that would limit Senators to two terms.
Source: 2018 Ohio Senatorial website GibbonsForOhio.com Oct 15, 2017

Jon Husted: States should police elections, not Feds

Ohio's elections chief said he would provide the Presidential Commission on Election Integrity looking into voter fraud with only the voter information that is public. "Confidential info won't be provided," Husted tweeted.

Husted said he ordered detailed reviews of credible allegations of voter fraud & voter suppression after the last 3 federal elections. The investigations were conducted by Ohio's 88 bipartisan county boards of elections. None found significant instances of voter fraud or abuse

Source: US News & World Report on 2018 Ohio gubernatorial race May 23, 2017

Jim Renacci: End campaign contributions that lead to government contracts

Renacci said as governor he will focus on jobs, regulatory reform and ending political corruption in Columbus, including allowing officeholders from awarding government contracts to campaign contributors. "I don't believe that politicians should get campaign contributions and then turn around and give them government contracts. There are a number of situations where I've learned that is occurring in the state. That needs to stop," he said.
Source: Dayton Daily News on 2018 Ohio gubernatorial race Feb 4, 2017

Ted Strickland: Overturn Citizens United with constitutional amendment

Q: On Campaign Finance: Support Supreme Court's Citizens United decision, which allows unlimited independent political expenditures by corporations and unions?

Portman: Yes

Strickland: No. Supports constitutional amendment to overturn.

Q: On Campaign Finance: Do you support the DISCLOSE Act, which requires key funders of political ads to put their names on those ads?

Portman: No. Voted against it.

Strickland: Yes

Source: CampusElect Voter Guide to 2016 Ohio Senate race Oct 9, 2016

Ted Strickland: Citizens United lets billionaires' dark money buy elections

Q: Should the US Congress address the influence of money in politics, especially in light of the US Supreme Court decision in Citizens United?

Ted Strickland: The Supreme Court's Citizens United decision opened the doors to unlimited dark money and for millionaires and billionaires to try and buy elections for themselves. It undermines our democracy and rightly makes people even more frustrated with politics. It has created a rigged system where the Washington establishment and the wealthy special interests spend millions to elect those like Senator Portman who are pushing their agenda at our expense. In the U.S. Senate, I will work to overturn Citizens United so that to our country cannot be bought and sold, and I'll support additional campaign finance reforms to increase transparency and accountability in campaign donations and spending. I will also support Supreme Court judges that will put our democracy before the interests of corporate billionaires.

Source: Vote411.org League of Women Voters on 2016 Ohio Senate Race Sep 19, 2016

John Kasich: A handful of billionaires should not decide who is president

John Kasich was asked how he planned to curb the influence of money in politics in the wake of the Supreme Court's Citizens United decision. "Every time we change the laws, we have laws that we think are worse than laws that we had," Kasich said. "I don't know what I believe the answer is, but I will tell you if I win I will think the system works pretty well. And if I don't win, I'm going to blame it on the system," he joked.

[After that] the closest he came to broaching the subject of campaign finance reform was when he declared that "sometimes I think these laws can work, but unfortunately I think they work mostly on the margin." Got it? Neither do we.

Kasich took a different tack last month when he said that "a handful of billionaires should not decide who is president." But, even then, he was unsure of a solution to the problem.

Kasich has an unlimited-money super PAC. Earlier this year, it announced raising more than $11 million from 166 reportable contributions.

Source: Huffington Post on 2018 Ohio Gubernatorial race Aug 12, 2015

P.G. Sittenfeld: The right to cast a ballot is under assault

Fifty years ago, the struggle for civil rights took a giant step forward when the Voting Rights Act of 1965 became the law of our land. But today, the right to cast a ballot freely and have it counted fairly is under assault.

Two years ago, the Supreme Court invalidated a key provision of the Voting Rights Act. And in states all across America--including Ohio--cut-backs in early voting and calls for photo IDs--which an estimated 25% of African-Americans don't have--are the transparent tools of voter suppression.

Republicans say they're only trying to stop voter fraud. But even in the hotly contested 2004 Presidential election, Ohio's rate of voter fraud was 4/1000 of 1%--or roughly the same odds as being struck and killed by lightening. So the real fraud isn't coming from voters. The real fraud is coming from politicians--and we can't let them get away with it.

Source: 2016 Ohio Senate race: Center of Hope Baptist Church speech Aug 9, 2015

John Kasich: Deal with fundraising influencing voting decisions

When campaigning in New Hampshire, John Kasich was asked about money in politics and corporate personhood as defined in Citizens United. Kasich agreed that something needs to be done so that billionaires don't get to pick who gets elected:

Q: "What would you do to end corruption of our government by big money, and more specifically, would you support and work for a constitutional amendment clarifying that the constitution applies to natural persons only?"

A: "I'd like to say a couple things about campaign finance laws. First of all it is a bad system when billionaires can be the ones to pick a president, I don't like that. And here is the beauty of New Hampshire: they could spend all the money in the world but money don't buy you love in New Hampshire. So I'm concerned about it, and I will have something to say about it at an appropriate time, but I want to think it through. I think there is an element of fundraising influencing decisions. It's an issue & it will be dealt with."

Source: AFSC.org press release on 2018 Ohio Gubernatorial race Jul 23, 2015

P.G. Sittenfeld: Constitutional amendment to overturn Citizens United

Q: What new ideas have you put out that qualifies you for Senate?

A: One thing that is new in the sense that it is not implemented right now: I do believe we need a Constitutional amendment to overturn the post-Citizens United corrosive role of money in politics.

Q: That's not a new issue, though. Since the Supreme Court ruling, that's been an issue.

A: I'm trying to put forth things that aren't currently in play. If we get more leaders like me, we can make it happen.

Source: OTI transcript of Cincinnati Enquirer: 2016 Ohio Senate race May 12, 2015

ACLU: Don't require "complete" ID on absentee ballots

SB 205 revises the law regarding the mailing of absent voter's ballots, permitting election boards to discard votes cast where an absentee ballot identification envelope is "incomplete," in addition to the current language of "insufficient."

ACLU-Ohio opinion on this bill: While SB 205 does make some positive improvements for voters with disabilities, it fails on several fronts to make voting easier for Ohioans. One of the most concerning aspects of SB 205 is the addition of the word "incomplete" in reference to a voter's absentee ballot identification envelope. Giving discretion to a few election officials to define exactly what this word means is likely to result in more ballots not being counted. Additionally, this language is overly broad and could violate federal law. The ACLU encourages the legislature to steer away from creating a "race to the bottom" by limiting ballot access of voters and contemplate more constructive ways to improve the absentee ballot process.

Source: ACLU commentary on Ohio legislative voting records: SB 205 Feb 21, 2014

ACLU: Keep "Golden Week" for registration and early voting

SB 238 shortens the early, in-person voting period by eliminating the week-long window where voters may simultaneously register to vote and cast an early in-person ballot (otherwise known as "Golden Week")

ACLU-Ohio opinion on this bill: SB 238 moves Ohio election administration in the wrong direction. Eliminating "Golden Week" and shortening the early voting period will needlessly complicate the voting process and place additional burdens on voters. Voters with disabilities, seniors, the homeless, new residents, people with a lack of transportation, among many others, have utilized Golden Week as a flexible way to register & vote simultaneously. While the bill's sponsors may point to concerns over possible voting irregularities, there is almost no evidence to justify those fears. Rather than seeking to curtail the ability of voters to cast their ballot more easily, Ohio's legislators should strive to provide a fair, flexible and secure system that benefits all voters.

Source: ACLU commentary on Ohio legislative voting records: SB 238 Feb 21, 2014

John Kasich: Require complete & sufficient ID on absentee ballots

SB 205 revises the law regarding the mailing of absent voter's ballots, permitting election boards to discard votes cast where an absentee ballot identification envelope is "incomplete," in addition to the current language of "insufficient."

ACLU-Ohio opinion on this bill: While SB 205 does make some positive improvements for voters with disabilities, it fails on several fronts to make voting easier for Ohioans. One of the most concerning aspects of SB 205 is the addition of the word "incomplete" in reference to a voter's absentee ballot identification envelope. Giving discretion to a few election officials to define exactly what this word means is likely to result in more ballots not being counted. Additionally, this language is overly broad and could violate federal law.

Legislative outcome: Passed Senate, 22-10-1, on Nov. 6, 2013; passed House, 60-38-1, on Feb. 19, 2014; signed by Gov. Kasich, Feb. 21, 2014

Source: ACLU commentary on Ohio legislative voting records: SB 205 Feb 21, 2014

John Kasich: End simultaneous registration and early voting

SB 238 shortens the early, in-person voting period by eliminating the week-long window where voters may simultaneously register to vote and cast an early in-person ballot (otherwise known as "Golden Week")

ACLU-Ohio opinion on this bill: SB 238 moves Ohio election administration in the wrong direction. Eliminating "Golden Week" and shortening the early voting period will needlessly complicate the voting process and place additional burdens on voters. Voters with disabilities, seniors, the homeless, new residents, people with a lack of transportation, among many others, have utilized Golden Week as a flexible way to register & vote simultaneously. While the bill's sponsors may point to concerns over possible voting irregularities, there is almost no evidence to justify those fears.

Legislative outcome: Passed Senate, 22-10-1, on Nov. 20, 2013; passed House, 59-37-3, on Feb. 19, 2014; signed by Gov. Kasich, Feb. 21, 2014

Source: ACLU commentary on Ohio legislative voting records: SB 238 Feb 21, 2014

Connie Pillich: Don't require "complete" ID on absentee ballots

SB 205 revises the law regarding the mailing of absent voter's ballots, permitting election boards to discard votes cast where an absentee ballot identification envelope is "incomplete," in addition to the current language of "insufficient."

ACLU-Ohio opinion on this bill: While SB 205 does make some positive improvements for voters with disabilities, it fails on several fronts to make voting easier for Ohioans. One of the most concerning aspects of SB 205 is the addition of the word "incomplete" in reference to a voter's absentee ballot identification envelope. Giving discretion to a few election officials to define exactly what this word means is likely to result in more ballots not being counted. Additionally, this language is overly broad and could violate federal law.

Legislative outcome: Passed Senate, 22-10-1, on Nov. 6, 2013; passed House, 60-38-1, on Feb. 19, 2014; Rep. Pillich voted NAY; signed by Gov. Kasich, Feb. 21, 2014

Source: ACLU commentary on Ohio legislative voting records: SB 205 Feb 19, 2014

Connie Pillich: Keep "Golden Week" for registration and early voting

SB 238 shortens the early, in-person voting period by eliminating the week-long window where voters may simultaneously register to vote and cast an early in-person ballot (otherwise known as "Golden Week")

ACLU-Ohio opinion on this bill: SB 238 moves Ohio election administration in the wrong direction. Eliminating "Golden Week" and shortening the early voting period will needlessly complicate the voting process and place additional burdens on voters. Voters with disabilities, seniors, the homeless, new residents, people with a lack of transportation, among many others, have utilized Golden Week as a flexible way to register & vote simultaneously. While the bill's sponsors may point to concerns over possible voting irregularities, there is almost no evidence to justify those fears.

Legislative outcome: Passed Senate, 22-10-1, on Nov. 20, 2013; passed House, 59-37-3, on Feb. 19, 2014; Rep. Pillich voted NAY; signed by Gov. Kasich, Feb. 21, 2014

Source: ACLU commentary on Ohio legislative voting records: SB 238 Feb 19, 2014

Joe Schiavoni: Keep "Golden Week" for registration and early voting

SB 238 shortens the early, in-person voting period by eliminating the week-long window where voters may simultaneously register to vote and cast an early in-person ballot (otherwise known as "Golden Week")

ACLU-Ohio opinion on this bill: SB 238 moves Ohio election administration in the wrong direction. Eliminating "Golden Week" and shortening the early voting period will needlessly complicate the voting process and place additional burdens on voters. Voters with disabilities, seniors, the homeless, new residents, people with a lack of transportation, among many others, have utilized Golden Week as a flexible way to register & vote simultaneously. While the bill's sponsors may point to concerns over possible voting irregularities, there is almost no evidence to justify those fears.

Legislative outcome: Passed Senate, 22-10-1, on Nov. 20, 2013; Sen. Schiavoni voted NAY; passed House, 59-37-3, on Feb. 19, 2014; signed by Gov. Kasich, Feb. 21, 2014

Source: ACLU commentary on Ohio legislative voting records: SB 238 Nov 20, 2013

Joe Schiavoni: Don't require "complete" ID on absentee ballots

SB 205 revises the law regarding the mailing of absent voter's ballots, permitting election boards to discard votes cast where an absentee ballot identification envelope is "incomplete," in addition to the current language of "insufficient."

ACLU-Ohio opinion on this bill: While SB 205 does make some positive improvements for voters with disabilities, it fails on several fronts to make voting easier for Ohioans. One of the most concerning aspects of SB 205 is the addition of the word "incomplete" in reference to a voter's absentee ballot identification envelope. Giving discretion to a few election officials to define exactly what this word means is likely to result in more ballots not being counted. Additionally, this language is overly broad and could violate federal law.

Legislative outcome: Passed Senate, 22-10-1, on Nov. 6, 2013; Sen. Schiavoni voted NAY; passed House, 60-38-1, on Feb. 19, 2014; signed by Gov. Kasich, Feb. 21, 2014

Source: ACLU commentary on Ohio legislative voting records: SB 205 Nov 6, 2013

Josh Mandel: No government bailout that I would ever support

The two parried on the auto bailout, which Brown supported. Brown said he was "proud of his work," and cited it as a key reason Ohio's economy has recovered more quickly than the rest of the nation's. "My opponent says my vote for the auto rescue was un-American. To me, that vote was doing my job to fight for their jobs."

But Mandel seemed to indicate he opposed all bailouts. "I'm not a bailout senator," he said. "There's no government bailout that I can think of that I would ever support."

Source: Dayton Daily News on 2012 Ohio Senate debate Oct 25, 2012

Josh Mandel: Does not accept gifts in public office

Josh Mandel does not take gifts. Or does he? The Ohio treasurer and U.S. Senate candidate asserted that he does not, and he said so in the most public of settings: a roomful of reporters from the Akron Press Club. The club wanted to give Mandel a token of appreciation (a flash drive with the club's logo) after he addressed it on March 1. "I appreciate it. I don't take gifts," Mandel said.

This raises a question: Why did Mandel recently declare in a public document that he got gifts from 31 people in 2011? That number of gift-givers, and their names, showed up in the state financial disclosure statement that Mandel filed this week. This disclosure led incumbent Sen. Sherrod Brown's campaign to declare that Mandel lied when he told reporters that he doesn't take gifts.

Mandel's campaign spokesman says the gifts were primarily meals at "family gatherings, weddings, meetings and charity events."

Source: The Cleveland Plain Dealer on 2012 Ohio Senate debates Apr 20, 2012

Josh Mandel: Public officials should disclose more than is required

[Mandel listed] 31 people as gift-givers in 2011 in the state financial disclosure statement filed this week. [A campaign spokesperson] added that even though Ohio requires state officials to disclose all gifts above $75, many of the meals Mandel listed cost less but were disclosed anyway, in an abundance of transparency. Mandel has said in his most recent and in past financial disclosure reports that he tries to provide more information than required.

If there were gifts of significantly high value or items that went beyond food or drink, the disclosure forms do not say, as the Ohio Ethics Commission only requires state officeholders to disclose the source of gifts valued at more than $75 but does not require specificity as to the gifts themselves.

The US Senate require only gifts worth more than $335 to be reported. Brown's most recent form said he had none. Mandel "goes above and beyond what is required on his disclosure forms," the spokesperson said. "More elected officials should do that."

Source: The Cleveland Plain Dealer on 2012 Ohio Senate debates Apr 20, 2012

John Kasich: Skinny-down bureaucracy & kick out special interests

Make Government More Efficient And Effective--Skinny-down state bureaucracy to ensure taxpayers are getting their money's worth, and reform state government into a 21st century partner with Ohio's job creators--not one that punishes business with outdated or unnecessary regulation;

End The Influence Of Special Interests--Build common-sense solutions to our problems and kick out those who, for too long, have kept us from fixing all that is wrong in our state

Source: 2010 Gubernatorial campaign website, kasichforohio.com Nov 2, 2010

Michael Pryce: Remove all contribution & spending limits on campaigns

Q: Do you support increasing the amount individuals are permitted to contribute to federal campaigns?

A: Yes.

Q: Should Congress regulate indirect campaign contributions from corporations and unions?

A: No.

Q: Do you support removing all contribution limits on federal campaigns?

A: Yes.

Q: Should candidates for federal office be encouraged to meet voluntary spending limits?

A: No.

Source: Ohio Congressional Election 2010 Political Courage Test Nov 1, 2010

Eric Deaton: Limit & regulate campaign contributions

Q: Do you support increasing the amount individuals can contribute to federal campaigns?

A: Yes. First amendment rights appear to protect all campaign contributions without limits, but limits must be in place to keep us from creating class warfare and to keep foreign influences out of our election system.

Q:Should Congress regulate indirect campaign contributions from corporations and unions?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support removing all contribution/spending limits on federal campaigns?

A: No.

Source: Ohio Congressional 2010 Political Courage Test Aug 11, 2010

Eric Deaton: No line item veto; limit "signing statements"

Q: Do you support the line item veto for items concerning appropriations?

A: No.

Q: Do you support limiting the President's ability to define how legislation is applied through the use of signing statements?

A: Yes. Presidential signing statements should not change the intent of the very laws passed by congress and should only be used to clarify (after consultation with congress) or to protest the possible Constitutionality of the new legislation.

Source: Ohio Congressional 2010 Political Courage Test Aug 11, 2010

Joyce Beatty: Limit campaign contributions & campaigm spending

Q: Do you support limiting individual contributions to state legislative candidates?

A: Yes.

Q: PAC contributions?

A: Yes.

Q: Corporate?

A: Yes.

Q: Political Parties?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support requiring full and timely disclosure of campaign finance information?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support imposing spending limits on state level political campaigns?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support partial funding from state taxes for state level political campaigns?

A: No.

Source: Ohio Legislative 2000 National Political Awareness Test Nov 1, 2000

Charlie Wilson: Supports public funding for political camapigns

Q: Do you support current limits on individual contributions to state legislative candidates?

A: Yes.

Q: PAC contributions?

A: Yes.

Q: Corporate contributions?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support requiring full and timely disclosure of campaign finance information?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support imposing spending limits on state level political campaigns?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support partial funding from state taxes for state level political campaigns?

A: Yes.

Source: 1998 Ohio Legislative National Political Awareness Test Nov 1, 1998

Lee Fisher: Campaign spending limits, but no state funding

Q: Do you support current limits on the following types of contributions to state legislative candidates: Individual?

A: Yes.

Q: PAC?

A: Yes.

Q: Corporate?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support requiring full and timely disclosure of campaign finance information?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support imposing spending limits on state level political campaigns?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support partial funding from state taxes for state level political campaigns?

A: No.

Q:

Source: Ohio Gubernatorial 1998 National Political Awareness Test Nov 1, 1998

  • The above quotations are from State of Ohio Politicians: Archives.
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