State of Tennessee Archives: on Education


Lamar Alexander: COVID: direct some relief funding to school choice programs

Senators Tim Scott and Lamar Alexander offered a bill during congressional negotiating over COVID-19 relief funding that would redirect some of that funding to school-choice programs. Tying it to the economic harms and school shutdowns was wise, because it signaled to families who might not traditionally support conservative politicians that the GOP was taking seriously their concerns about being able to continue sending their children to the schools that are best for them.
Source: National Review on 2020 Tennessee Senate race Sep 30, 2020

Marquita Bradshaw: Relieve current student debt, provide quality childcare

I support the right to a fully funded high-quality public education. I am a lifelong proponent of funding our education system the same as we do our military. We must:
Source: 2020 Tennessee Senate campaign website MarquitaBradshaw.com Aug 26, 2020

Bill Lee: 4% salary boost for teachers; make $40,000 minimum salary

I'm proposing the largest investment in K-12 teacher salaries in Tennessee history. My budget sets aside $117 million additional dollars for teachers, an amount equal to a 4% increase in the state's contribution to teacher salaries. We must also work harder to make teaching a more attractive profession for young people. Over the next two years, we will recommend moving the minimum salary schedule for teachers from $36,000 to $40,000, so that no teacher is making less than $40,000 per year.
Source: 2020 State of the State Address to the Tennessee legislature Feb 3, 2020

Bill Lee: Focus on new initiatives in teacher training

Our Department of Education will be working with our schools of education, to ensure that our approach to training teachers is the best. The Tennessee Teacher and Leader Institute will solicit proposals to help launch a new initiative that will build the best educator preparation program in the nation. We're investing $4 million to support professional development opportunities for school leaders and innovative career advancement opportunities for our best-performing teachers.
Source: 2020 State of the State Address to the Tennessee legislature Feb 3, 2020

Bill Hagerty: Shift education spending to block grants to states

Every student in Tennessee, regardless of their zip code, should be prepared with skills for whatever path they choose after graduation. He will work to increase funding for charter schools and protect religious and parochial schools from government interference. He strongly opposes "Common Core" and "No Child Left Behind" and supports significantly decreasing funding for the Department of Education and shifting that money to the states via block grants.
Source: 2020 Tennessee Senate campaign website TeamHagerty.com Dec 24, 2019

Manny Sethi: Not government's role to wipe away college debt

We need to solve this college debt issue and lower prices of what schools are charging and figure out a way that students don't come out strapped with $200,000 in debt.

I don't believe it's the role of government to wipe away college debt. We need to take a look at what colleges are charging and figure out how to lower costs. In a competitive job market with free market rules, there's an effective way to solve this, but government is not the answer.

Source: Nashville Tennessean on 2020 Tennessee Senate race Dec 4, 2019

Bill Lee: Fund school choice; competition via charters and ESAs

Parents need more choices and those options should be well-funded and highly accountable. I believe highly accountable public charter schools are a great model for expanding choice without sacrificing quality, and I've seen how they can impact the life and trajectory of a student. We are doubling the amount of public charter school facility funding and I will support legislation this year that makes it easier to open good charter schools and easier to close bad ones.

Education Savings Accounts will enable low-income students from under-performing school districts to attend an independent school of their choice at no cost to their family. I know there's concern that this will take money from public schools, but my plan will invest at least $25 million new dollars in public schools in the first year. Creating competition will provide a new incentive for schools to improve and provide new opportunities for thousands of students.

Source: 2019 State of the State address to the Tennessee legislature Mar 6, 2019

Bill Lee: Schools must focus on acquiring job skills

The job market can change quickly and education must stay in sync with industry. Elementary and middle schools need to begin skills training earlier and, from top to bottom, high school needs to look a lot different. I'm proposing the Governor's Investment in Vocational Education--the GIVE Act--a $25 million investment to increase the number of young adults earning an industry certification and entering a career within one year of high school graduation.

I recently announced the Future Workforce Initiative, a $4 million effort to increase STEM training in K-12 schools. The Future Workforce Initiative will add 100 new CTE programs, grow the number of teachers qualified to teach work-based learning and computer science classes, and expand access to AP courses and early postsecondary options for high schoolers. We are also investing in agricultural education by allocating new recurring funding for both FFA and 4-H youth programs.

Source: 2019 State of the State address to the Tennessee legislature Mar 6, 2019

Bill Lee: Teach civics, with unapologetic American exceptionalism

It was reported that young people in this country have a more favorable view of socialism than capitalism. How will our children know of our cherished American values if we do not teach them? We cannot expect future generations to build upon the incredible progress our country has made if we fail to teach them the history and values that made it possible. In this state, our children will be taught civics education, character formation, and unapologetic American exceptionalism.
Source: 2019 State of the State address to the Tennessee legislature Mar 6, 2019

Bill Lee: Supports charter schools & vouchers

Q: Increase funding for K-12 education?

Karl Dean (D): Yes. Wants to make public education a top priority as governor.

Bill Lee (R): No. Wants to better use existing dollars. Will appoint an inspector general to "seek out waste & abuse in the system."

Q: Education: Support expansion of charter schools or provide vouchers or tax breaks to parents to send their children to private schools with public money?

Karl Dean (D): Opposes vouchers & for-profit charter schools. Believes nonprofit charter schools have a role to play in large urban districts, though "they're not a silver bullet."

Bill Lee (R): Yes. Supports charter schools. "Vouchers are an opportunity to provide another choice. We should certainly pilot voucher programs to see what positive impact they could have."

Source: 2018 CampusElect.org Issue Guide on Tennessee Governor race Oct 9, 2018

Karl Dean: Opposes vouchers & for-profit charter schools

Q: Increase funding for K-12 education?

Karl Dean (D): Yes. Wants to make public education a top priority as governor.

Bill Lee (R): No. Wants to better use existing dollars. Will appoint an inspector general to "seek out waste & abuse in the system."

Q: Education: Support expansion of charter schools or provide vouchers or tax breaks to parents to send their children to private schools with public money?

Karl Dean (D): Opposes vouchers & for-profit charter schools. Believes nonprofit charter schools have a role to play in large urban districts, though "they're not a silver bullet."

Bill Lee (R): Yes. Supports charter schools. "Vouchers are an opportunity to provide another choice. We should certainly pilot voucher programs to see what positive impact they could have."

Source: 2018 CampusElect.org Issue Guide on Tennessee Governor race Oct 9, 2018

Marsha Blackburn: Supports vouchers for private schools

Q: Provide public support for parents to choose private schools for their children?

Marsha Blackburn (R): Yes, has voted for vouchers.

Phil Bredesen (D): No. Supports charter schools but "not wild about vouchers."

Source: 2018 CampusElect.org Issue Guide on Tennessee Senate race Oct 9, 2018

Marsha Blackburn: Don't lower student loan interest

Q: Refinance student loans at lower rates?

Marsha Blackburn (R): No. Voted against earlier proposal to refinance student loans.

Phil Bredesen (D): Some level of support. "I'm someone who went to school with student loans, but they were much lower interest than these student loans & longer pay-out times."

Q: Should federal student financial aid, like Pell Grants, be increased?

Marsha Blackburn (R): Unknown.

Phil Bredesen (D): Unclear, but earlier pushed for free community college tuition.

Source: 2018 CampusElect.org Issue Guide on Tennessee Senate race Oct 9, 2018

Phil Bredesen: Supports charter schools but "not wild about vouchers

Q: Provide public support for parents to choose private schools for their children?

Marsha Blackburn (R): Yes, has voted for vouchers.

Phil Bredesen (D): No. Supports charter schools but "not wild about vouchers."

Source: 2018 CampusElect.org Issue Guide on Tennessee Senate race Oct 9, 2018

Phil Bredesen: Free community college tuition; lower student loan interest

Q: Refinance student loans at lower rates?

Marsha Blackburn (R): No. Voted against earlier proposal to refinance student loans.

Phil Bredesen (D): Some level of support. "I'm someone who went to school with student loans, but they were much lower interest than these student loans & longer pay-out times."

Q: Should federal student financial aid, like Pell Grants, be increased?

Marsha Blackburn (R): Unknown.

Phil Bredesen (D): Unclear, but earlier pushed for free community college tuition.

Source: 2018 CampusElect.org Issue Guide on Tennessee Senate race Oct 9, 2018

Bill Lee: Education, including vocational, is key to a bright future

Improving our education system is the single most powerful tool for transforming the future. I'll work to improve our workforce development pipeline, increase choice and transparency, and focus on recruiting the best and brightest to lead schools and classrooms. The newfound focus on vocational and technical education is a talking point. It's been my life for 35 years. My company employs 1200, hundreds of which are skilled tradesmen who are in rewarding careers without a college degree.
Source: 2018 Tennessee Gubernatorial website BillLee.com Jul 4, 2018

Karl Dean: Expand access to vocational training programs

Most of Tennessee's fastest growing industries and occupations require some type of postsecondary education or training. Karl supports Tennessee's current focus on increasing the number of college graduates. In fact, as mayor, he created public-private support for free access to community college in Nashville before Tennessee Promise was implemented statewide.

However, Karl also knows that college isn't the right fit for every high school graduate. As governor, he will work to expand access to vocational training programs across Tennessee, and he will work to align them with the industries and jobs that are growing in our state.

Source: 2018 Tennessee Gubernatorial campaign website KarlDean.com Mar 21, 2018

Karl Dean: Increase teacher pay; more resources for schools

Karl has pledged to make public education his top priority as governor. He made the same commitment as Mayor of Nashville and fulfilled it through every operating and capital budget he proposed. During his eight years in the mayor's office, he worked with the Metro Council to increase funding for Nashville schools by an astounding 37 percent and invested $629 million in school buildings and other capital infrastructure for the school district. The graduation rate increased, the dropout rate went down and test scores improved.
Source: 2018 Tennessee Gubernatorial campaign website KarlDean.com Mar 21, 2018

Karl Dean: Supports charters; opposes vouchers

While Karl believes in school choice, he opposes the use of for-profit charter schools and vouchers. Private school vouchers would allow taxpayer dollars to fund private schools, taking money directly away from Tennessee public schools. And while many nonprofit charters are among the highest performing schools in the urban school districts of Memphis and Nashville, Karl believes charters with a profit motive can't focus on doing what's best for their students. Karl believes nonprofit charter schools have a role to play in large urban districts, but they're not a silver bullet. However, he believes rural areas do not have large enough student populations for charter schools to be an effective tool.
Source: 2018 Tennessee Gubernatorial campaign website KarlDean.com Mar 21, 2018

Larry Crim: Children should have quality education minus crushing debt

Larry Crim wants young people to have an opportunity for a quality education including college without incurring a lifetime of debt. Larry Crim highly values higher education such that he wants young people to be able to obtain the same kind of academic achievements he has been fortunate to acquire, so that all have the equal opportunity to realize their potential in life and contribute to our national economy through realizing productive jobs, careers, and public service.
Source: 2018 Tennessee Senate campaign website LarryCrimUSSenate.com Feb 28, 2018

Larry Crim: Children should have quality education minus crushing debt

Larry Crim wants young people to have an opportunity for a quality education including college without incurring a lifetime of debt. Larry Crim highly values higher education such that he wants young people to be able to obtain the same kind of academic achievements he has been fortunate to acquire, so that all have the equal opportunity to realize their potential in life and contribute to our national economy through realizing productive jobs, careers, and public service.
Source: 2018 Tennessee Senate campaign website LarryCrimUSSenate.com Feb 28, 2018

Bill Haslam: Boost public education by $1.5B

If the budget I am proposing for next year is approved, we will have added nearly $1.5 billion to K-12 education, with more than $500 million for teacher salaries. These are unprecedented increases and anyone who claims this administration is not fully committed to public education is simply ignoring the facts. We have supported our educators and public schools and we will continue to do so. But we will do it in a way that improves student outcomes, not one that erases the gains we have made.
Source: 2018 Tennessee State of the State address Jan 29, 2018

James Mackler: Against vouchers, for accountability

By reducing accountability for charter schools, promoting public funding for voucher programs, and loosening the regulations on for-profit colleges, the administration is putting our children's future at risk. Tennessee needs a U.S. Senator that will stand up and fight against these policies, not enable them to continue.
Source: 2018 Tennessee Senatorial website JamesMackler.com Oct 1, 2017

Diane Black: Supports tax dollars for private schools

A firm believer in school choice, I supported the Scholarships for Opportunity and Results (SOAR) Reauthorization Act, leveraging Congress's oversight role to ensure that DC education funds specifically include charter schools and scholarships for low-income families to use towards private schooling where the student's assigned public school may not be up to par. If we can showcase the success of school choice in Washington D.C., states can choose to replicate it nationwide.
Source: 2018 Tennessee Gubernatorial website black.house.gov Aug 31, 2017

Karl Dean: Small city property tax increase to directed to education

In a video, the Republican Governors Association [showed Dean saying that he raised property taxes but] did not include Dean's entire commentary on taxes. Dean went on to say that he was perhaps the first Metro mayor who did not raise taxes during his first term and that he opted to raise property taxes during his second term for "a variety of reasons."

"No. 1, you've got to run the city and you've got to make sure that you're taking care of the services that are needed by the citizens," Dean told reporters. "And that tax increase was directed largely to education."

Dean, in his statement, said despite a "small property tax increase" during his second term, Metro's property tax rate was still lower when he left the mayor's office than when he arrived. "This was because we saw property values grow significantly and by state law, tax rates have to go down to adjust for an increase in assessed values," Dean said.

Source: The Tennessean on 2018 Tennessee gubernatorial race Apr 25, 2017

Bill Lee: Charter schools change lives of at-risk youth

Through a YMCA program aimed at helping at-risk youth, Lee said he met a Nashville high school student, Adam, whom Lee withdrew from a traditional public school and enrolled in a charter school, a decision that he said changed the boy's life. He also cites mentor experiences at Men of Valor, a re-entry program for ex-offenders, as the reasons why he ended up being part of the state's Higher Education Commission and Gov. Bill Haslam's Task Force on Sentencing and Recidivism.

Those experiences helped form his views on education, public safety and correction. He said he developed "a vision for something bigger" and found himself wondering whether he could expand his influence. "What if I could make life better for six and a half million people? That was a compelling thought to me," he said. "That is really what drove me to consider running for governor."

Source: The Tennessean on 2018 Tennessee gubernatorial race Apr 23, 2017

Karl Dean: Supports publicly financed, privately led charter schools

Dean has a challenge to unite his party before getting a chance to deploy his statewide strategy. Although considered a popular mayor, Dean sometimes butted heads with Democrats over his support of publicly financed, privately led charter schools. He's also not allied with labor unions, a key Democratic constituency. He instead has closer ties to the business community and Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce.
Source: The Tennessean on 2018 Tennessee Gubernatorial race Feb 26, 2017

Karl Dean: Expand school choice teacher accountability

Dean called public education "the major civil rights issue of our time" and his top priority. He said he wants to build off the work of Tennessee's "two pro-education governors," Bredesen and Haslam. Both men supported education reforms that included expanding school choice and controversial accountability measures for teachers. Tennessee should be known as a place, Dean said, where you want to move to because of the education.
Source: The Tennessean on 2018 Tennessee Gubernatorial race Feb 26, 2017

Karl Dean: Charters ok if non-profit, but vouchers not ok

Though known for his support of charter schools, Dean said his education approach might look different as governor than as a mayor of a large urban city. He also said he opposes vouchers that would divert public funds to private schools and opposes for-profit charter schools.

"I think what my record as mayor of Nashville speaks to is that when I say education will be a priority, it will be a priority," he said.

Source: The Tennessean on 2018 Tennessee Gubernatorial race Feb 26, 2017

Bill Haslam: Narrow score gaps for minority and female students

On education, there is no state in the U.S. that is demanding the spotlight like Tennessee. With the incredible hard work of our teachers and students, Tennesseans are the fastest improving in the country in math, reading and as of this year, science. We received the science scores from the Nation's Report Card, and beyond being the fastest improving, we narrowed the gaps between African American, Latino and white students. We also completely eliminated the gap between male and female students.
Source: 2017 State of the State address to Tennessee Legislature Jan 30, 2017

Bill Haslam: STRONG Act: tuition-free public college for veterans

I've had the chance to personally witness Tennessee's National Guard in action, whether it's in Afghanistan or McMinn County, helping those communities recover from devastating tragedy. Tonight, we're announcing the Tennessee STRONG Act to provide tuition free attendance for these men and women at our public universities and colleges. If we can help our soldiers and airmen who protect us at home and abroad, I know you agree we should do it.
Source: 2017 State of the State address to Tennessee Legislature Jan 30, 2017

David Kustoff: Oppose Common Core; local folks know best

Source: 2016 Tennessee House campaign website KustoffForCongress.com Nov 8, 2016

Bill Haslam: Tennessee Promise: two years of free community college

Last year, we introduced the Tennessee Promise--the very first state in the country to guarantee high school graduates two years of free community college or technical school. This year, of our 65,000 high school seniors, 58,000 of them applied for the Tennessee Promise. And 9,200 adult Tennesseans signed up to be volunteer mentors for those students.

For the last 30 years, Tennessee's greatest need has been for better trained workers who can fill the jobs that companies want to bring here. We think the Tennessee Promise is a game changer.

We're also going to include $400,000 in this year's budget to establish the Tennessee Promise Bridge Program. It's a pilot program to bring first-generation students to campus prior to fall enrollment. When nobody in your family has ever gone to college before, being there can be intimidating. This is one more step to make sure these students have the best chance possible to succeed.

Source: State of the State address to 2015 Tennessee Legislature Feb 9, 2015

Bill Haslam: $2.5M for SAILS program: math tutors for high school seniors

It is also why our SAILS program is so important. SAILS gives students who need extra support in math that attention during their senior year in high school so they can avoid remediation when they enter college. We piloted the program two years ago, and the results speak for themselves. Last year, 8,100 students were served by the SAILS program, and almost 70 percent of those students completed all remediation while still in high school. That saved families nearly $6.5 million in tuition. This year we are including $2.5 million to sustain the success of the SAILS program.

But the reality is that just reaching high school graduates won't be enough to reach our goal. In Tennessee, there are nearly one million adults with some post-secondary credit but without a degree. We have to figure out ways to reconnect those adults and remove the barriers that are preventing them from earning their certificate or degree, which will lead to a better job and future.

Source: State of the State address to 2015 Tennessee Legislature Feb 9, 2015

Gordon Ball: I believe in public education

I grew up in Cocke County, one of the poorest counties in our state. It was my public education that allowed me to become a success in life and gain the opportunity to be where I am today. I want the same opportunity for all our children, whether they live in a poor county, an inner-city housing project or a prosperous suburb. Equal opportunity demands it. That's the American dream. I believe in public education.

We need to return to viewing education as an investment in our future. We need to support early childhood education and give kids a fair shot at success from their earliest days. We need to continue support for school lunch programs. No child needs to worry more about being hungry than about an education. We need to impress upon our state legislatures the importance of incorporating financial literacy into curriculums for grades 6-12. We need to work collaboratively with teachers, not against them, to improve the performance of students, teachers, and schools.

Source: 2014 Tennessee Senate campaign website, GordonBallSenate.com Aug 7, 2014

Bill Haslam: Drive to 55: 55% get post-HS certificate or degree by 2025

In the year 2025, 55 percent of Tennesseans will need a certificate or degree beyond high school to get a job. Today, only 32 percent of Tennesseans qualify. To truly be America at its best, that's not good enough.

This time last year, I announced the Drive to 55--our effort to reach at least 55 percent by 2025. This isn't just about higher education--it's about better jobs for more Tennesseans. It's about building a stronger economy. I have spent a lot of time over the past two years on workforce readiness. I am more convinced than ever that our urgent needs are in the areas of access, quality and relevance. To tackle these, our Drive to 55 initiative focuses on five key goals:

  1. Getting students ready;
  2. Getting them into school;
  3. Getting them out of school;
  4. Finishing what we started with adult students; and
  5. Tying education directly to workforce needs.
Source: 2014 State of the State address to Tennessee legislature Feb 3, 2014

Joe Carr: Prohibit discrimination against college religious groups

Joe Carr voted Yea on HB 534--Nondiscrimination Policies for College Student Religious Groups. Summary
Source: VoteSmart summary of 2013-2014 Tennessee voting record Mar 18, 2013

Bill Haslam: Drive to 55: Increase college graduation to 55% by 2025

Today, we base funding on the number of students who are actually graduating [instead of on enrollment]. This shift puts the focus where it should be--on graduates. And because we're seeing results, this year's budget fully funds, for the first time, the Complete College Act outcomes formula.

Only 32% of Tennesseans have earned an associates' degree or higher. That's not good enough. Our goal is to move the needle so that Tennessee is on track to raise that number to 55% by 2025. Tonight we begin our "drive to 55"--a strategic initiative to have the best trained workforce in America. To do that, we must improve affordability and access in higher education. To help us achieve this goal, we're partnering with Western Governors University to establish "WGU Tennessee." It is an online, competency-based university that is geared to the 800,000 adult Tennesseans that have some college credit but didn't graduate with an associate or four-year degree.

Source: 2013 State of the State speech to Tennessee legislature Jan 28, 2013

Bill Haslam: Remove 90-cap limit on charter schools

Charter schools open new opportunities for learning and we have asked for the 90-cap limits to be removed and for more students to have the option of a charter school as a learning environment. There are a number of innovative approaches to classroom instruction underway and we can learn from the experiences of others.

The City University School of Liberal Arts is a charter school with a college preparatory foundation. Students have full access to diverse advanced placement courses and dual enrollment at Christian Brothers University. In Nashville the LEAD Academy is the city's first charter high school with a vision to do Whatever It Takes to ensure students graduate from high school and attend college. The Metropolitan Nashville school system is 1 of 9 in the country recognized by the Gates Foundation for a collaborative approach to blend charter schools in with other district schools.

Source: 2011 State of the State speech to Tennessee legislature Mar 14, 2011

Phil Bredesen: New reforms: student achievement to evaluate teacher

I want now to talk for a moment with the teachers in our state. I do understand that some of the changes we have made, especially those regarding the use of student achievement in teacher evaluation, cause some of you concern. I've talked with a lot of teachers these past few weeks. Some hate these changes, some love them, many are concerned but waiting to see. I want you to know that I understand and respect your concerns, and understand that teaching is a profession that has many more dimensions than can be measured by a student's performance on a written test. I also understand that there are many factors beyond your control; the influence of home and parents, and the personalities of the students themselves. Let's work together to find an approach that is both fair to your teaching profession and which gives our citizens confidence that the money they have invested in our schools is being used well.
Source: Tennessee 2010 State of the State Address Feb 1, 2010

Phil Bredesen: $48M for state colleges for tuition, & $10M scholarships

To support a comprehensive strategy on education, Bredesen made the following proposals to the General Assembly:
Source: 2007 State of the State address to Tennessee legislature Feb 5, 2007

Don Sundquist: Invest more in teachers and in early education

    A RAND report found that Tennessee isnít doing as well as other states in student achievement and performance goals because weíve only invested in one of three essential ingredients. Those three essential ingredients are:
  1. Reducing class size, which we are doing.
  2. Early childhood education, which we do very little of.
  3. Investing in teachers, which we need to do more of.
Itís time for us to make significant investments in each of these areas.
Source: 2001 State of the State Address to Tennessee legislature Jan 29, 2001

Don Sundquist: We test students & rate schools; now invest in reading

In 1992, the Education Improvement Act, put in place a system of testing and assessment that has made Tennessee a national leader. Thanks to those assessments, we know exactly how our children are doing in school.

Last fall, for the first time, we posted school report cards on the web. You can log on and see test scores and gains for every public school in the state.

With all this knowledge in hand, and with the results of a literacy report commissioned by this body, now we know that itís time to focus on reading in Tennessee. We know from test scores that our children canít read as well as they should. We donít want our legacy to be that we failed to solve our problems. We donít want our legacy to be that we passed them on to the next generation because we didnít have the courage to make the difficult choices. We must invest more in education and expect more in return.

Source: 2001 State of the State Address to Tennessee legislature Jan 29, 2001

Don Sundquist: Invest in teachers: scholarships, mentors, merit pay

Source: 2001 State of the State Address to Tennessee legislature Jan 29, 2001

  • The above quotations are from State of Tennessee Politicians: Archives.
  • Click here for definitions & background information on Education.
  • Click here for other issues (main summary page).
2020 Presidential contenders on Education:
  Democrats running for President:
Sen.Michael Bennet (D-CO)
V.P.Joe Biden (D-DE)
Mayor Mike Bloomberg (I-NYC)
Gov.Steve Bullock (D-MT)
Mayor Pete Buttigieg (D-IN)
Sen.Cory Booker (D-NJ)
Secy.Julian Castro (D-TX)
Gov.Lincoln Chafee (L-RI)
Rep.John Delaney (D-MD)
Rep.Tulsi Gabbard (D-HI)
Sen.Amy Klobuchar (D-MN)
Gov.Deval Patrick (D-MA)
Sen.Bernie Sanders (I-VT)
CEO Tom Steyer (D-CA)
Sen.Elizabeth Warren (D-MA)
Marianne Williamson (D-CA)
CEO Andrew Yang (D-NY)

2020 Third Party Candidates:
Rep.Justin Amash (L-MI)
CEO Don Blankenship (C-WV)
Gov.Lincoln Chafee (L-RI)
Howie Hawkins (G-NY)
Gov.Gary Johnson(L-NM)
Howard Schultz(I-WA)
Gov.Jesse Ventura (I-MN)
Republicans running for President:
Sen.Ted Cruz(R-TX)
Gov.Larry Hogan (R-MD)
Gov.John Kasich(R-OH)
V.P.Mike Pence(R-IN)
Gov.Mark Sanford (R-SC)
Pres.Donald Trump(R-NY)
Rep.Joe Walsh (R-IL)
Gov.Bill Weld(R-MA & L-NY)

2020 Withdrawn Democratic Candidates:
Sen.Stacey Abrams (D-GA)
Mayor Bill de Blasio (D-NYC)
Sen.Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY)
Sen.Mike Gravel (D-AK)
Sen.Kamala Harris (D-CA)
Gov.John Hickenlooper (D-CO)
Gov.Jay Inslee (D-WA)
Mayor Wayne Messam (D-FL)
Rep.Seth Moulton (D-MA)
Rep.Beto O`Rourke (D-TX)
Rep.Tim Ryan (D-CA)
Adm.Joe Sestak (D-PA)
Rep.Eric Swalwell (D-CA)
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